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72nd NYS Woodsmen's Field Days

August 16, 2019 72nd NYS Woodsmen's Field Days

9:30 am - 4:30 pm

New York State Woodsmen's Field Days

Phone: (315) 942-4593

www.woodsmensfielddays.com

118 Main St

Boonville, NY 13309

The NYS Woodsmens Field Days is held at the Fairgrounds in Boonville, New York the third full weekend in August. This event honors the forestry industry. This gathering is a major stop on the lumberjack and lumberjill competition circuit.  The Field Days brings together a huge variety of forestry related displays of interest to both the professional logger and the occasional firewood cutter.

DAILY ADVANCE SALE TICKETS

$9 per adult, $7 per child (12 and under) • Available until Thurs., Aug. 16, 2018

Advance-sale tickets are available locally at Community Bank & Drive Thru, Slim’s, Kinney’s, Freddy’s, Hill Top in West Leyden and Marino’s in Lyons Falls, or with a credit card over the phone at 315-942-4593 and we hold tickets at the gates.

3-DAY WEEKEND PASS

$27 per adult, $21 per child (12 and under)

* * Children 5 years of age & under are FREE **

Available until Fri., August 17, 2018 • NO REFUNDS after August 1, 2018

Credit Cards Accepted


DAILY ADMISSION AT THE GATE

$11 per adult, $8 per child (12 & under)

Military Members & Senior Citizen 60 & Over – $9

* * Children 5 years of age & under are FREE **

The NYS Woodsmens Field Days, a nonprofit organization, was founded by the Rev. Frank Reed in 1948. With the support of over 400 volunteers, the Field Days have evolved into one of the predominant lumberjack contests in the United States today. Contestants come from as far away as Canada, Australia and New Zealand to compete in the festivities. Woodsmen’s contest are held all day Friday, Saturday and Sunday. All weekend there are hundreds of displays of various forestry related equipment, chainsaw carving demonstrations, safety demonstrations and more.

While the primary goal of the NYS Woodsmen’s Field Days is promotion of the forest industry, the original intent of Rev. Reed is still taken into consideration: to honor the lumberjack, a vanishing breed of men.